Posts Tagged ‘retirement planning’

Financial Goals for the Real World

October 26, 2010

 

It’s in all the advertisements for financial service providers: “Let us help you achieve your goals!” “Your life. Anything is possible.” “Take charge of your financial future.” “What’s your dream?” “Together we’ll go far.” And the commercials with attractive silver-haired Baby Boomers sailing the ocean blue or chuckling over the Wall Street Journal while sipping coffee… does anyone really aspire to that?

 

beach

But the point is, without a bit of a dream behind them, financial goals can be as wishy-washy as a weight loss goal without a fitness and nutrition plan. You need motivation and some guidelines to stick with it or like a diet, the first chocolate cake you encounter will have you off the wagon and giving up.

But what does it really mean to set financial goals? What are your goals? Wait, you haven’t really thought about it? Many people don’t because they don’t think they are in a place to do so. They say things like, “I don’t have time or money for any new goals in my life.” Or, “Just getting the kids to and from school and putting food on the table while growing my career is enough of a goal for me!” Sound familiar?

So let me re-frame the question: If money wasn’t an issue, what would you do differently? Move to a different neighborhood? Go back to school? Go on a safari? Pay off your credit cards? Or even just hire a housekeeper? These are financial goals.

So go ahead, list them out. Then try to put a price on each goal. For example, a move to a different neighborhood could be as simple as the cost of moving: $2,000 for movers, $1,500 for a security deposit, $500 for those miscellaneous things that you always seem to need when you move like new wastebaskets and perhaps a small furniture piece.

For others it might require accumulating a down payment and getting your current home ready for sale. That’s going to require a bigger budget.

Not sure how much your goal will cost? Start doing some research. Call your community college to inquire about the average cost of a Master’s degree. Google “house cleaning” to find out what cleaning services in your area charge. Just doing the research and finding out a bit more about your “someday” dream will make it a touch more real and set you up to being closer to making it “today.”

And just like that, you’ve set some financial goals! With that out of the way, it makes it much easier to figure out how to achieve them. And trust me, it’s really not that difficult. I’ll be covering those steps in a future post, so stay tuned!

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Financial Advice for the Ages

October 12, 2010

There are some personal finance rules of thumb that are set in stone across the board, no matter who you are, how much money you have or what your financial goals are. For example, whether you make $1,000 per month or are worth $10 million, you should have an emergency fund that equals a minimum of three months expenses.

But then there are also rules and suggestions that change as you age and (hopefully) earn more money. Depending on your situation, here are a few age-based tips to maximize your financial well-being.

Mid-twenties
At this age you’re probably still single, no kids, making pretty decent money, traveling a bit, pretty career-focused and not thinking too much about retirement. What essential steps should you be taking?

  1. Get debt-free and stay that way. Pay off your credit cards, student loans and car loan to get your credit score in tip-top shape for when you will inevitably want to qualify for the best mortgage rates.
  2. Take advantage of your employer’s 401k benefit. If you’re offered a match, put at LEAST the amount in there to maximize the match. Aim to defer at least 6% of your salary, 10% if you can afford it.
  3. Get your emergency fund in place ASAP. Start with only $25 per paycheck if you have to, but make it automatic, and once the money is in there it stays. You’ll be glad you have it if you lose your job or have an accident.

Mid-thirties
If you’re a typical American, by this time you own a home, have 2.3 kids and are settled into a career that provides a solid income. You probably spend a lot of time at your kids’ events and have a couple of nice cars in the garage. Make sure you’re staying financial healthy by also doing the following:

  1. Keep socking that money into your 401k. Do NOT sacrifice retirement savings to pay for your kids’ education. They don’t give retirement scholarships or loans.
  2. But you should be saving for college if you can. Decide how much you do want to help (some people want their kids to pay for some to make sure they value the opportunity) then open a 529 account for each child with monthly automatic contributions. Also, make sure you’re matching any expensive extracurricular activity costs with college savings. If you can’t afford to save for college AND pay for select soccer or elite gymnastics, reconsider the high-end program. Chances are your child won’t be making a career out of it and while it might be a tough pill to swallow to drop down to a more affordable league, it will be a lesson in sacrifices and choices that won’t be forgotten.
  3. Make sure your emergency fund balance has been adjusted to cover increases in your expenses over time. Once you’ve reached the goal, keep up with the automatic monthly savings into a Roth IRA or money market savings account.

Mid-fifties
You survived toddlers and are now enjoying the final teen years with your kids, who are hopefully college-bound overachievers. You may be considering a second act career or wondering what the heck you’re going to do with your time once the last of your brood flies the nest. What else should you be thinking about?

  1. It’s probably time to really think about what retirement means to you, then putting that story into numbers. Most people these days aren’t really planning to live out their days on a golf course, but would like the flexibility to hit the links when they like while also staying engaged and active. Think about how the cost of your lifestyle will change and make sure you can weather that.
  2. Take a look at how your 401k (you’re still contributing, right?) is allocated. At this point you should only have about 50% of your funds in stocks, so make any updates to put the other 50% in solid bond funds or other fixed income instruments.
  3. Try to get your house paid off sooner rather than later. Your goal should be to retire completely debt-free.

As with all personal finance tips, these are simply general ideas based on what the “average” American deals with through life. Of course your situation is going to be different and you’ll make adjustments as needed according to what’s important to you. Above all, remember that the purpose of all of this is to simply allow you to enjoy life without having money as a barrier to pursuing your calling.

401k Fitness Class

August 23, 2009

How did you decide which funds to use when establishing your employer-sponsored retirement plan (aka 401k, 403b, profit-sharing, etc)? Have you made any adjustments after the last market meltdown? How do you know when to make a change or how to determine the percentages for each fund? When was the last time you rebalanced your account? Don’t worry if you haven’t a solid answer to any of these questions. Most people don’t! However, your retirement account will most likely be your biggest asset down the road, and just like other long-term plans and goals, it does need a little nurturing along the way to produce the best end result. Check out my 401k Fitness class for individual coaching in a group setting at an economic price. Please contact me for dates of upcoming classes.

What is 401k fitness?

It is a small class designed to re-visit basic terms associated with investing, followed by 1-on-1 coaching to shape up your retirement portfolio to take advantage of current market conditions. You’ll learn tips for keeping it on track going forward as well as leave with a better understanding of the nuts and bolts of mutual fund investing.